Tag Archives: federal securities laws

Auditing the Auditor: SEC Charges Firm With Inadequate Surprise Exams

On April 29, 2016, the SEC brought and settled charges that an accounting firm, Santos, Postal & Co. (“Santos”) and one of its principals, Joseph Scolaro (“Scolaro”), performed inadequate surprise exams of one of their investment advisor clients, SFX Financial (“SFX”), the president of which stole over $670k from SPX clients. Santos and Scolaro neither admitted nor denied the allegations in the SEC Order but consented to its entry and to disgorgement and penalties totaling over $55,000. Santos and SColaro agreed to be suspended from practicing before the SEC, which includes preparing financial reports and audits of public companies. Santos and Scolaro are permitted to apply for reinstatement after one and five years, respectively.

Because SFX was deemed to have custody of client assets under SEC Rule 206(4)-2 (the “Custody Rule”), SFX was required to hire an independent accountant (Santos) to perform surprise audits. The Custody Rule seeks to protect clients from asset misappropriation by investment advisors (e.g., Ponzi schemes). Accordingly, among other things, Santos was supposed to contact SFX’s clients to verify that they were aware of the contributions and withdrawals into and out of their accounts as reflected in SPX’s records. According to the SEC Order, Santos failed to actually contact clients about such transactions.

The SEC previously announced charges against SFX’s president Brian Ourand, who was later found by an administrative judge to have misappropriated funds from client accounts in violation of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. Ourand was ordered to pay disgorgement of $671,367 plus prejudgment interest and a $300,000 penalty, and was barred from the industry. SFX and its CCO separately agreed to settlements.

The SEC’s Order relating to Santos and Scolaro can be found here:

Click to access 34-77745.pdf

SEC: Ski Resort Operators Abused Immigrant Investor Program (EB-5)

The SEC recently announced it would pursue fraud charges and freeze the assets of the Jay Peak, Inc. Vermont ski resort. The SEC alleges that Ariel Quiros, of Miami, and William Stenger, of Vermont, conducted an illegal Ponzi-like scheme in connection with the funds raised for the resort. The total amount of money in question with these activities is $350 million, a large portion of which was raised through the EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program, a program designed to incentivize foreign investment by promising a fast track to a green card.

According to the SEC, Quiros and Stenger diverted money from the ski resort project to other projects in an attempt to finance them. In addition, an alleged $50 million was spent on Quiros’s personal expenses, such as his personal income taxes and a luxury condominium. There appears to be little money left to fund the ski resort renovations.

Further, the actions of Quiros and Stenger could put many investors’ funds and immigration petitions in jeopardy. In order to get their green card the investors need to fund at least 10 new jobs, which may not happen here.

Given these charges, it is unclear whether investors who were considering committing capital to U.S. projects under EB-5 will still do so. It is also unclear as to whether this is a continuing problem or isolated incident.

Here’s the link to the SEC news release.  https://www.sec.gov/news/pressrelease/2016-69.html