Category Archives: DOL Fiduciary Rule

Supreme Court Holds 5-Year Statute of Limitations Applies to SEC Disgorgement

On June 5, 2017, by unanimous decision, the U.S. Supreme Court determined that disgorgement – a remedy that generated $3 billion in 2015 – is a “penalty” thereby subjecting it to the 5-year statute of limitations that applies to any “action, suit or proceeding for the enforcement of any civil fine, penalty, or forfeiture, pecuniary or otherwise.” Kokesh v. SEC, No. 16-529, slip op. at 1 (June 5, 2017) (quoting 28 U.S.C. §2462). The Court’s decision relieved Kokesh of a $30 million disgorgement order entered in the lower court.

The SEC had argued that disgorgement is a different animal – it simply places the defendant in the same position as he or she would have been but for the offense. The Court strongly disagreed noting the deterrent qualities of disgorgement, which is a hallmark of a penalty, “[s]anctions imposed for the purpose of deterring infractions of public laws are inherently punitive.” Id. at 8. The Court observed that the victims (if there are any) of a securities law violation need not participate in the enforcement action and may not even support it. In addition, money that is disgorged to the Treasury often stays there; i.e., there is no absolute requirement that the money that is recovered be distributed to the purportedly aggrieved investors.

Going forward, the SEC is faced with having to speed up its investigations and charging decisions.  That can be a challenge, especially in complex cases where the Enforcement Division would prefer to thoroughly build out a case in advance.

Here is the decision:

https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/16pdf/16-529_i426.pdf

 

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DOL Proposes 60-Day Delay of Fiduciary Rule

The DOL has proposed an initial 15-day public comment period on the issue of whether to delay the April 10 implementation date of the DOL fiduciary rule, which, if ever effective, would subject large amounts of IRA rollover advice, and other retirement advice, to a fiduciary standard. After the 15 days, the DOL has proposed another 45 days during which the DOL is to analyze the economic impact of the Rule on investors and the marketplace.

Specifically, in his February 3, 2017 memorandum, President Trump directed the the DOL “to examine the Fiduciary Duty Rule to determine whether it may adversely affect the ability of Americans to gain access to retirement information and financial advice.” Accordingly, it is likely that the Rule, as is or amended, will not become effective for some time. Meanwhile, many broker dealers, registered investment advisers, and the representatives they employ have already spent thousands of hours in training and millions of dollars preparing to comply with the Rule.

Stay tuned.

Level Fee Advisers & The DOL Rule – Yes, It Applies To RIAs (But It’s Not That Bad)

RIAs serving customers on a percentage of assets under management (% AUM) basis, or for some other non-variable form of comp (e.g., flat fees), need to be aware that it is not “business as usual” under the DOL Fiduciary Rule, some version of which is likely to go into effect in 2017. While such advisers are not subject to the full Best Interest Contract Exemption Requirement with its onerous contract and disclosure requirements, they must comply with a lesser requirement, sometimes called “BIC Lite”.

Many RIAs are surprised to learn that they will have this additional requirement because they are already fiduciaries under the 1940 Investment Advisers Act and are often fiduciaries under ERISA and DOL guidance when providing regular advice to Plans. The DOL Rule, however, extends ERISA and Tax Code fiduciary status to one-off investment advice about rollovers from 401ks to IRAs and from commissioned IRA accounts to fee IRA accounts. RIAs who are deemed to be giving (even limited) “investment advice” to Plans and IRA owners will have to comply with BIC Lite.

Specifically, advisers will have to provide a written acknowledgement of fiduciary status to Plan and IRA clients and state that they will abide by certain Impartial Conduct Standards. Under those standards, advisers must act in the client’s best interest, receive only reasonable compensation, and not make misleading statements to clients. RIAs must also document the advice given (including apprising customers of the pluses and minuses of staying where they are versus rolling over) and the reasons for that advice.

In sum, the biggest changes under the DOL Rule apply to folks charging variable compensation (e.g., commissions) to Plans and IRA owners. That said, RIAs should not assume that their current policies and practices bring them into full compliance with BIC Lite. RIAs should check those policies and practices, including documentation procedures, and make sure they are up to snuff.